Seasonal Bites #1

It’s hard to believe we are just a week away from Christmas! 2018 has been the most bizarre year ever. While I am looking forward to 2019, I’m kind of scared to see what the new year will bring. Until then, I guess I will console myself with delicious treats. As y’all know, I love sharing recipes. I came across this mouth-watering dessert. I normally don’t care for pecan anything, but I will make an exception for this! A great dish for the season. Grab a mixing bowel and enjoy 🙂

Caramel Apple Pecan Pie

Ingredients
For the Apple Filling
  • 9 apples, peel, core and slice (Granny Smith)
  •  cup brown sugar
  •  cup sugar
  • 2 tsp lemon juice
  • 2 tsp corn starch
  • 1 tsp cinnamon
  • ¼ tsp nutmeg
  • 1 cup pecans, chopped
For the Caramel Sauce
  • ¾ cups butter, 1½ sticks
  • 1 cup light brown sugar
  • ¼ cup milk
  • 1 tsp vanilla
For the topping
  • 3 cups all purpose flour
  • 2/3 cup brown sugar
  • 2/3 cup sugar
  • 3 tsp baking powder
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 2 stick butter, cut into small pieces
  • 2/3 cup boiling water
Additional topping
  • 3 Tbs sugar
  • 1 tsp cinnamon
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 375°
For the Filling
  1. Add sliced apples to large mixing bowl.
  2. Sprinkle brown sugar, sugar, cinnamon, corn starch, lemon juice and nutmeg over apples.
  3. Stir until apples are coated then add pecans. Stir.

For the Caramel Sauce
  1. In a small heavy bottom pan, melt butter over low heat.
  2. Stir in brown sugar and milk.
  3. Bring to a boil over low heat and continue stirring constantly for 12 minutes.
  4. Remove from heat and add 1 tsp of vanilla. Stir.

  5. Let caramel cool for 10 minutes. Pour over apple mixture and stir (save a small amount to drizzle over the top. You will have to heat it up again so that the sauce is easy to pour).

  6. Pour into an ungreased 13 x 9 baking dish.
For the Topping
  1. In a medium mixing bowl, whisk flour, sugar, brown sugar, baking powder and salt together.
  2. Using a pastry blender, mix butter into flour mixture until crumbly.

  3. Pour in boiling water and stir until combined.
  4. Spoon mixture over apples and spread making sure to cover all the apples.

  5. In a small bowl, mix sugar and cinnamon together and sprinkle on top.

  6. Bake for approximately 35 minutes, or until topping is golden brown.

Recipe from Great Grubs Delicious Treats

Thursday Giveaway: Shuri

It’s hard to believe it was just this year the phenomenon of Black Panther hit the theaters. The film went on to gross over a billion dollars within a matter of days. The thrill of seeing a new Black superhero on-screen, after being inundated with Spiderman/Batman/Iron Man movies, brought Black folks out in droves. It was a refreshing time, an opportunity for Black folks to have fun for a change, in a society that works hard to suppress our joy.

While there were debates on the characters of T’Challa/Black Panther vs. Killmonger, everyone loved them some Shuri. Shuri’s (Letitia Wright) infectious giggle and her brilliance/creativity with technology, made her an instant favorite. Especially, with Black girls/women. So, it’s fitting that she would be the next character to get some shine, after Black Panther. Last month, author Nnedi Okorafor, announced her collaboration with Marvel Comics to start an unlimited series on Shuri.

Of course, everyone just about fell out, including myself. I ordered a copy right away. I thought I would share it, cuz hell why not.  If you are a Black girl/woman who is a huge fan of Shuri, let me know why. You can submit a paragraph gushing about Shuri, write a poem, etc., however you like to express yourself. Please email womanishseeme@yahoo.com with “Shuri Giveaway” in the subject line. Ready, set…go! 😉

 

 

 

Ntozake Shange

“Somebody almost walked off with all of my stuff…”

This line starts my favorite monologue from Ntozake Shange’s award-winning choreopoemfor colored girls who have considered suicide / when the rainbow is enuf . Shange recently passed away at the age of 70. Her death has received little attention in mainstream media. It has been mostly Black women honoring her life/work, probably because Shange wrote about our lives in such an honest and frank way, it’s hard for many people to digest.

ntzoke

Shange detailed our pain/fears/disappointments, but also our healing. In a society that is anti-black/woman/poor etc., Black women often find themselves navigating a myriad of oppressions (racism, sexism, classim, heterosexism, colorism).  Shange’s for colored girls… captured all of these “isms” so eloquently, it’s not surprising it’s considered an iconic piece of work.

The homegoing of Shange (as well as Aretha Franklin), highlights the importance of always celebrating brilliant Black women, when the world quickly wants to forget them. Thank you so much Ms. Shange, and rest well.

 

 

 

Domestic Violence Awareness Month

This month has been going by so fast, I almost forgot to pay homage to Domestic Violence Awareness Month.

“National Domestic Violence Awareness Month is an annual designation observed in October. For many, home is a place of love, warmth, and comfort. It’s somewhere that you know you will be surrounded by care and support, and a nice little break from the busyness of the real world. But for millions of others, home is anything but a sanctuary. The U.S. Department of Justice estimates that 1.3 million women and 835,000 men are victims of physical violence by a partner every year.” https://nationaldaycalendar.com/national-domestic-violence-awareness-month-october/

It is especially important to honor Domestic Violence Awareness Month, as the current administration has made it clear its disdain of women. The absurdity that surrounded Brett Kavanaugh’s confirmation hearings is an example of this hatred. The whole situation was alarming, because if a white upper-class highly educated woman could be treated with such venom, what hope is there for women who aren’t as privileged. Particularly, Black/women of color.

I thought about this when I recently attended an event focusing on domestic violence in communities of color. Black/women of color often face unique challenges when trying to deal with the issue of violence in their lives (interpersonal, sexual assault, etc.) They are forced to rely on institutions that have historically oppressed, ignored, or exploited them (healthcare services, law enforcement, etc.) The workshop I participated in, the speaker discussed the need to create resources for Black/women of color outside these dominant systems. This can look like building underground networks for these women.

As the speaker noted, “Since the days of slavery, we as a people have been resourceful in creating safety amongst ourselves because safety historically has not existed for us within dominant culture. As enslaved peoples our ancestors created and learned to use codes and underground avenues to create safety and community amongst themselves. This same concept applies for DV survivors of color today; safety and support is sought in unconventional ways.”

We also watched a video featuring Bernadine Waller. Waller talked about the stereotypes and assumptions about Black women that make it hard for them to be taken seriously as victims of violence. She urged professionals to see Black women, to REALLY see us…to see our humanity.  Waller’s speech was moving, and highlighted how much work needs to be done in ensuring that Black women are living whole and healthy lives.

 

Black Women Read

A couple of months ago, I decided to revamp my YouTube channel.  I wanted it to reflect my interests in literature/writing. I review books, zines, and everything in between (movies, etc.) It’s an opportunity to expand my work on a different platform. I’m still working out the kinks, but it’s been fun to play around with creating videos/video editing. I’ve been inspired by so many wonderful Black YouTube content creators. In a few videos, you may hear light snoring in the background. I usually have to record while my toddler is napping 😉 I encourage folks to subscribe, like and comment! 🙂