Zoe Saldana as Nina Simone

So, Zoe Salanda decided to go ahead and look foolish in a new movie based on Nina Simone’s life. Yesterday, For Harriet posted this new image of Zoe from the film:

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😦

It’s bizarre that Zoe doesn’t seem to get why it’s wrong to dress up in blackface to portray a dark-skinned Black American woman icon:

“I know who I am and I know what Nina Simone means to me,” Saldana said. “I can only rely on that and maintain as much humility as possible, so that when I have to face the world and we have to then give the movie to the world to see, and share it with them, that if it comes back in … a negative fashion or positive, I’m gonna keep my chin up. … And Nina was like that too.”–http://www.ibtimes.com/zoe-saldana-defends-nina-simone-role-says-im-doing-it-my-sisters-video-1107937

Umm, okay. The irony is that Nina Simone had to keep her chin up in the face of the colorism/marginalization of Black women’s voices that Zoe is participating in. She really should have passed on this role. As a friend said, why would all the folks involved in this film waste time having to “transform” someone to resemble Nina(blackface, prosthetic nose, and such) when they could just have hired someone who genuinely looked like her.

Normally, I like Zoe. However, she’s a fail here.

Any who, I definitely plan to see this film. I want to get my laugh on…

Books for Black Girls

I used to love to read as a child. My favorite books were “Jane Erye” and “The Secret Garden.”  I also was obsessed with Judy Blume books. I wish I had more books to read that were geared for black girls/children. But this was back in the 70’s/80’s when black children’s literature was rare to non-existent.  Now, there are more books for black parents to choose from. We still have a long way to go, but to see the range of black children’s literature these days, warms my heart. The blog For Harriet, recently listed their “25 Empowering Books for Little Black Girls.”

“From the moment they come into the world, little black girls works just a little bit harder than their peers to construct a healthy sense of self in a society that prizes values and attributes that don’t mirror those they possess. We as their caregivers must help them find the way by offering them as many affirming messages as possible. We can do this with our words and by our example; however, books can also prove to be important points of contact into the souls and spirits of black girls.” http://www.forharriet.com/2013/10/25-empowering-books-for-little-black.html

They followed up with a second list “25 More Empowering Books for Little Black Girls.”   It’s times like these, I wish I had a child. I would fill their room with all these wonderful books  🙂

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“Something Beautiful” by Sharon Dennis Wyeth